Tag : renovate

7 years, 6 months ago 0
Posted in: General

Ok, thats probably misleading but “After Putting It Off for So Long, You Now Have a Bee Problem” didn’t sound nearly as good.  As soon as the weather warmed up, the bees started swarming.  We’ve noticed them for a couple years now but it really seemed like the sheer number of bees was much more than usual.  So we finally did something about it and called in a local bee farmer to remove the bees.  The honeycomb must be removed too or they will come right back. 

After suiting up, he had to cut into the soffit and fascia to expose the honeycomb, which he then removed by hand.  The honeycomb is brought back to his farm to feed his bees.  Once he removed all the comb, he pulled out his homemade shop vac and sucked up all the bees.   The shop vac is set at just the right amount of suction so as to not harm the bees.  He also brings the bees back to his farm to add to his colonies.

All in all, it’s a pretty interesting procedure and my kids definitely enjoyed watching it.  Now we have to properly seal everything back up in an effort to keep any new bees from setting up shop again.

7 years, 7 months ago 0

We just picked up another property today and we are fired up to start the renovations.  Built in 1919, this house is about three times as old as I am but I’m going to give it a new lease on life.  Just about everything needs to be done of course and once we make a few layout changes, there will be five bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms.  The address is 327 N. McNeil St. and it sits in the Evergreen Historic District of Memphis.  Renovations should take 6-8 weeks so check back often for updates.  Take a look at the video and let me know if you want to see the property.  I got a feeling we will have a lot of interest in this house.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUoPuQue_tI&list=UUUaFVWRVwYn_MIILa9M6ITw&index=1&feature=plcp]

7 years, 7 months ago 0
Posted in: General

I came across a couple of houses recently with termite damage. As you can see in the pictures, a common place to find these little insects is behind the walls of your house eating the wood studs. In some of the other pictures, they were found in a roof valley.

Termites prefer moist wood. The soffit, fascia and decking were continually getting wet due to poor roof construction. When the shingles and felt were removed, the termites could be seen scurrying for darkness.

When treating termites, your two main options are a spot treatment or a full treatment. The spot treatment will be less expensive as only a specific area is sprayed. A full treatment will be more expensive but also more effective as the whole house is treated. Cost for a full treatment depends on the size of the house but should range from $400-$500 for a typical 1,300 square foot house.

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7 years, 8 months ago 0
Posted in: Contractors

Of course roofers cut corners! Not all roofing companies do as there are plenty of contractors that do everything by the book and are very professional. Unfortunately, there are some who will try to pull the wool over your eyes. The roof decking presents one of the easiest opportunities for roofers to cut corners.
In the pictures below, you see a couple of examples of this. The first shows a hole chewed in the decking by squirrels. The damaged section should have been cut out and replaced but you can see the felt underlayment is already being laid in the attempt to cover the blemish.
In the other two pictures, you can see where damaged sections of the decking where cut out but not replaced. This is a potentially life threatening corner to cut. Imagine walking on a roof a stepping on a spot with no decking. Next thing you know, you are face down in attic insulation or you’ve tumbled off your roof.
The best way to prevent the roofer from doing this to you is to walk the roof after all the existing materials have been removed but before any new materials are applied. You will be able to see any damaged spots and feel if any of the decking is weak or spongy. If you are afraid of heights, inspect from the ground with a pair of binoculars and have the roofer take pictures of the decking, especially around chimneys and valleys. Also, inspect the decking from the attic. Look for water stains. Turn off all the lights to see if sunlight is coming through anywhere, then inspect those areas.
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